A High-Protein Diet Increases Strain on the Kidneys and Raises Your Risk of Kidney Disease

A High-Protein Diet Increases Strain on the Kidneys and Raises Your Risk of Kidney Disease

It is often said that dietary protein increases strain on the kidneys and raises the risk of kidney failure.

Although it is true that people with established kidney disease should cut back on protein, this is absolutely not true of otherwise healthy people.

Numerous studies, even in athletes that eat large amounts of protein, show that a high protein intake is perfectly safe (38, 39, 40Trusted Source).

In fact, a higher protein intake lowers blood pressure and helps fight type 2 diabetes… which are two of the main risk factors for kidney failure (41Trusted Source, 42Trusted Source).

Also let’s not forget that protein reduces appetite and supports weight loss, but obesity is another strong risk factor for kidney failure (43Trusted Source, 44).

BOTTOM LINE:
Eating a lot of protein has no adverse effects on kidney function in otherwise healthy people and improves numerous risk factors.
Myth 10: Full-Fat Dairy Products Are High in Saturated Fat and Calories… Raising the Risk of Heart Disease and Obesity
High-fat dairy products are among the richest sources of saturated fat in the diet and very high in calories.

For this reason, we’ve been told to eat low-fat dairy products instead.

However, the studies do not support this. Eating full-fat dairy product is not linked to increased heart disease and is even associated with a lower risk of obesity (45).

In countries where cows are grass-fed, eating full-fat dairy is actually associated with up to a 69% lower risk of heart disease (46Trusted Source, 47Trusted Source).

If anything, the main benefits of dairy are due to the fatty components. Therefore, choosing low-fat dairy products is a terrible idea.

Of course… this does not mean that you should go overboard and pour massive amounts of butter in your coffee, but it does imply that reasonable amounts of full-fat dairy from grass-fed cows are both safe and healthy.

BOTTOM LINE:
Despite being high in saturated fat and calories, studies show that full-fat dairy is linked to a reduced risk of obesity. In countries where cows are grass-fed, full-fat dairy is linked to reduced heart disease.
Myth 11: All Calories Are Created Equal, It Doesn’t Matter Which Types of Foods They Are Coming From
It is simply false that “all calories are created equal.” Different foods go through different metabolic pathways and have direct effects on fat burning and the hormones and brain centers that regulate appetite (48, 49Trusted Source, 50).

A high protein diet, for example, can increase the metabolic rate by 80 to 100 calories per day and significantly reduce appetite (51Trusted Source, 52Trusted Source, 53Trusted Source).

In one study, such a diet made people automatically eat 441 fewer calories per day. They also lost 11 pounds in 12 weeks, just by adding protein to their diet (54Trusted Source).

There are many more examples of different foods having vastly different effects on hunger, hormones and health. Because a calorie is not a calorie.

BOTTOM LINE:
Not all calories are created equal, because different foods and macronutrients go through different metabolic pathways. They have varying effects on hunger, hormones and health.
Myth 12: Low-Fat Foods Are Healthy Because They Are Lower in Calories and Saturated Fat
When the low-fat guidelines first came out, the food manufacturers responded with all sorts of low-fat “health foods.” The problem is… these foods taste horrible when the fat is removed, so the food manufacturers added a whole bunch of sugar instead.

The truth is, excess sugar is incredibly harmful, while the fat naturally present in food is not (55Trusted Source, 56Trusted Source).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *